Volume 7, Issue 5, October 2018, Page: 209-215
The Traditional Knowledge Associated to Biodiversity in an Age of Climate Change
Lun Yin, Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences, Kunming, China
Misiani Zachary, Kenya Meteorological Department, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Nairobi, Kenya
Yanyan Zheng, Yunnan People’s Publishing House Ltd, Kunming, China
Received: Aug. 1, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 21, 2018;       Published: Sep. 15, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.earth.20180705.12      View  636      Downloads  49
Abstract
Climate change has largely influenced the biodiversity in the world, as the biodiversity hotspots areas are often also rich in cultural diversity, the local peoples have rich traditional knowledge associated to biodiversity, and these knowledge also provide alternative information about climate variability and climate change based on the experience and practices of biodiversity resource use. This review work examines the researches about traditional knowledge associated to biodiversity in monitoring and adapting to changing climatic conditions in different parts of the globe. We reviewed different reports from both International and Regional Organizations whereby we based our findings from the traditional knowledge and climate change, the traditional knowledge’s perception and lastly traditional knowledge’s adaption to climate change. In our findings we realized that traditional knowledge associated to biodiversity is not only effective toolbox, but also a process to adopt to the climate change at local level. Lastly this review also demonstrates how local people use their traditional knowledge about the climate to guide their biodiversity resource and its management. The disasters arising from negative impacts of climate change has brought many risks and threats to the indigenous peoples. This paper highlights the importance of integrating the scientific models in conjunction with traditional knowledge system of indigenous peoples. Integrating this traditional knowledge can add a significance value to the development of sustainable climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies that are rich in local content. It was observed that the traditional knowledge and coping strategies can no longer be fully adapted to the intensity and frequency of the present climate change due to unlimited resources and also lack the enough support from both local and international communities’ responsible for the climate policies.
Keywords
Climate Change, Biodiversity, Traditional Knowledge, Adaption & Cultural Values
To cite this article
Lun Yin, Misiani Zachary, Yanyan Zheng, The Traditional Knowledge Associated to Biodiversity in an Age of Climate Change, Earth Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 5, 2018, pp. 209-215. doi: 10.11648/j.earth.20180705.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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